Archive for July, 2015

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  • Pesticides found in most pollen collected from foraging bees in Massachusetts

    More than 70% of pollen and honey samples collected from foraging bees in Massachusetts contain at least one neonicotinoid, a class of pesticide that has been implicated in Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), in which adult bees abandon their hives during winter, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study has be published online July 23, 2015 in the Journal of Environmental Chemistry. "Data from this study clearly demonstrated the ubiquity ...

    Posted at July 29, 2015 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Pesticides found in most pollen collected from foraging bees in Massachusetts
  • Organic farming needs direction to be sustainable

    Large-scale organic farming operations, based on a review of almost a decade of data from 49 states, are not reducing greenhouse gas emissions, says a University of Oregon researcher. The increasing numbers of commercialized organic operations -- which still make up just 3 percent of total agricultural lands -- appear to contribute to increased and more intense levels of greenhouse gases coming from each acre of farmland, reports Julius McGee, a doctoral student in the ...

    Posted at July 22, 2015 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Organic farming needs direction to be sustainable
  • Insects may be the answer to consumer demand for more protein

    The growing consumer demand for protein -- and the lack of new farmland to raise more livestock -- could make insects an attractive alternative to traditional protein sources, according to a July 13 symposium at IFT15: Where Science Feeds Innovation hosted by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) in Chicago. "We have 7 billion people now and that's projected to be 9 billion in 2050. We're already using a third of the land on Earth for ...

    Posted at July 16, 2015 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Insects may be the answer to consumer demand for more protein
  • Déjà vu all over again:’ Research shows ‘mulch fungus’ causes turfgrass disease

    Inadvertently continuing a line of study they conducted about 15 years ago, a team of Penn State researchers recently discovered the causal agent for an emerging turfgrass disease affecting golf courses around the world. The disease, based on the symptoms expressed on finely mown turf, has been referred to as thatch collapse. It turns out that the fungus creating the condition -- which has been seen on courses in the United States, Australia, New Zealand and ...

    Posted at July 8, 2015 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Déjà vu all over again:’ Research shows ‘mulch fungus’ causes turfgrass disease
  • Pesticide study shows that sexual conflict can maintain genetic variation

    New research from the University of Exeter has shown that the sexually antagonistic gene for resistance to the pesticide DDT, which increases fitness in female flies but simultaneously decreases fitness in male flies, helps to maintain genetic variation. The findings contribute to the understanding of evolutionary dynamics and have important implications for pest management. The researchers used a genetic model and multiple experimentally evolving populations of the fly Drosophila melanogaster to test whether sexual conflict can ...

    Posted at July 2, 2015 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Pesticide study shows that sexual conflict can maintain genetic variation
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