Archive for October, 2015

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  • Wildflowers on farms — not just crops — can expose bees to neonicotinoids

    Since bee colonies started declining at alarming rates over the past few decades, some scientists have identified a group of pesticides called neonicotinoids that are commonly used on crops as a potential contributor. Now one team reports in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology that bees could be getting an unexpected dose of neonicotinoids from wildflowers on farms. Their results suggest past studies may have underestimated the bees' exposure to these compounds. Scientists trying to close ...

    Posted at October 28, 2015 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Wildflowers on farms — not just crops — can expose bees to neonicotinoids
  • With organic rice in demand, scientists to help farmers improve production

    Organic rice is increasingly desired by U.S. consumers, but farmers know that growing the grain chemically free can mean providing a feast for insects, diseases and weeds. That's why the U.S. Department of Agriculture has put $1 million on a multi-state team of scientists with a track record of battling pests toward the goal of making organic rice profitable for farmers and more available for consumers. The grant also establishes the first Center of Excellence for ...

    Posted at October 22, 2015 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on With organic rice in demand, scientists to help farmers improve production
  • Study finds glyphosate, acetamiprid to have relatively low toxicity for honey bees

    Researchers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) and Mississippi State University tested 42 commonly used pesticides in a realistic field setting in order to determine their toxicity levels. The results were published in the Journal of Economic Entomology. The researchers found that 26 pesticides, including many (but not all) neonicotinoids, organophosphates, and pyrethroids killed nearly all of the bees that came into contact with the test pesticide sprays. However, seven pesticides, including ...

    Posted at October 15, 2015 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Study finds glyphosate, acetamiprid to have relatively low toxicity for honey bees
  • Root microbiome engineering improves plant growth

    Humans have been breeding crops until they're bigger and more nutritious since the early days of agriculture, but genetic manipulation isn't the only way to give plants a boost. In a review paper published on September 25 in Trends in Microbiology, two integrative biologists present how it is possible to engineer the plant soil microbiome to improve plant growth, even if the plants are genetically identical and cannot evolve. These artificially selected microbiomes, which can ...

    Posted at October 8, 2015 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Root microbiome engineering improves plant growth
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