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  • Next-generation medical treatments and industrial applications such as removing pesticides from waterways

    An international study led by The Australian National University (ANU) will help underpin the development of next-generation medical treatments and industrial applications such as removing pesticides from waterways. Lead researcher Associate Professor Colin Jackson said the study significantly improved scientific understanding of the way that enzymes can change their function. Enzymes are the molecular machines that speed up chemical reactions in biology and are required for many medical and industrial innovations. "One of the biggest ...

    Posted at September 21, 2016 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Next-generation medical treatments and industrial applications such as removing pesticides from waterways
  • Ecological intensification of agriculture

    Putting a halt to the profound changes affecting agricultural landscapes: With this goal in mind, scientists, farmers and official representatives teamed up to look into ecological intensification as a potential solution. Agricultural landscapes in Germany have lost much of their diversity being dominated by crops such as maize and rapeseed today. This trend has also had an impact on the biodiversity of animals and wild plants and the consequences of excessive pesticide and ...

    Posted at September 14, 2016 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Ecological intensification of agriculture
  • Insecticide ryanodine: Building a chemical from the ground up

    For chemists like Sarah Reisman, professor of chemistry at Caltech, synthesizing molecules is like designing your own jigsaw puzzle. You know what the solved puzzle looks like -- the molecule -- and your job is to figure out the best pieces to use to put it together. "We look at the molecule we want to build and think about how to cut it up into pieces. When we are in the lab, the ...

    Posted at September 9, 2016 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Insecticide ryanodine: Building a chemical from the ground up
  • Making pesticide droplets less bouncy could cut agricultural runoff

    When farmers spray their fields with pesticides or other treatments, only 2 percent of the spray sticks to the plants. A significant portion of it typically bounces right off the plants, lands on the ground, and becomes part of the runoff that flows to streams and rivers -- often causing serious pollution. But a team of MIT researchers aims to fix that. By using a clever combination of two inexpensive additives to the ...

    Posted at September 2, 2016 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Making pesticide droplets less bouncy could cut agricultural runoff
  • The battle against aedes aegypti, the mosquito that spreads Zika

    The UC Mosquito Research Laboratory in Parlier is the epicenter of California research on the Aedes aegypti mosquito, a tiny, black and white mosquito that can spread the Zika virus. Aedes aegypti were first identified in California in June 2013, when they were found in the San Joaquin Valley communities of Clovis and Madera. They have now been detected in certain Fresno County neighborhoods, plus the Bay Area, and Southern California, according to ...

    Posted at August 25, 2016 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on The battle against aedes aegypti, the mosquito that spreads Zika
  • Pesticides used to help bees may actually harm them

    Pesticides beekeepers are using to improve honeybee health may actually be harming the bees by damaging the bacteria communities in their guts, according to a team led by a Virginia Tech scientist. The discovery, published in the journal Frontiers in Microbiology, is a concern because alterations can affect the gut's ability to metabolize sugars and peptides, processes that are vital for honeybee health. Beekeepers typically apply pesticides to hives to rid them of ...

    Posted at August 19, 2016 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Pesticides used to help bees may actually harm them
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