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  • Some pesticides linked to respiratory wheeze in farmers

    New research from North Carolina State University connects several pesticides commonly used by farmers with both allergic and non-allergic wheeze, which can be a sensitive marker for early airway problems. NC State epidemiologist Jane Hoppin and colleagues from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), the National Cancer Institute, Westat and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) used interview data from the 2005 -- 2010 Agricultural Health Study (AHS) ...

    Posted at August 12, 2016 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Some pesticides linked to respiratory wheeze in farmers
  • Two neonicotinoid insecticides may have inadvertent contraceptive effects on male honey bees

    Male honey bees, called drones, can be affected by two neonicotinoid insecticides by reducing male honey bee lifespan and number of living sperm. Both insecticides are currently partially banned in Europe. Researchers from Bern, Switzerland, together with partners from Thailand and Germany, call for more thorough environmental risk assessments of these neonicotinoids. In recent years, beekeepers have struggled to maintain healthy honey bee colonies throughout the northern hemisphere. In the first study to ...

    Posted at August 3, 2016 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Two neonicotinoid insecticides may have inadvertent contraceptive effects on male honey bees
  • How do pesticides protect crops?

    New research published today could lead to the fine-tuning of pesticide formulations to further increase crop yield. The findings also show a way to develop advanced performance formulations which will interact reversibly with plant surfaces and will leave their protective cuticles unharmed. Scientists from the University of Manchester have created a model of a leaf's wax surface similar to those found in wheat crops, in a project supported by the agrochemical company, Syngenta. ...

    Posted at July 28, 2016 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on How do pesticides protect crops?
  • Using ‘chemical origami’ to generate customizable, high-value chemicals from plants

    Following the discovery of a new and very valuable enzyme which folds linear molecules into different shapes, scientists at the John Innes Centre are building a 'triterpene machine' which will enable them to custom-build valuable chemical compounds called triterpenes and produce them in large, cost-effective quantities. Working with the pharmaceutical, agricultural and biotechnology industries, they hope to improve existing triterpenes to make better medicines with fewer side effects, or improve the specificity of ...

    Posted at July 21, 2016 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Using ‘chemical origami’ to generate customizable, high-value chemicals from plants
  • Q-biotype whitefly expands to eight Florida counties

    The Q-biotype whitefly, a significant pest that could damage agriculture, has spread from Palm Beach to seven other Florida counties, according to a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher. Crops that could eventually be affected include tomatoes, squash, beans, watermelons and many other vegetables and ornamentals, said Lance Osborne, an entomology professor at UF/IFAS. The whitefly species has now been reported in homeowners' yards and on plants in retail nurseries ...

    Posted at July 14, 2016 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Q-biotype whitefly expands to eight Florida counties
  • New farming strategies can help prevent soil runoff while maintaining high crop yields

    Soil and nutrient loss and runoff from agricultural fields are major problems environmentally and economically in the U.S. and globally. After heavy spring rains, soil and water runoff containing fertilizer and pesticides is washed downstream, carrying the sediment and chemicals to the Gulf of Mexico. This process creates a large oxygen-starved area which is toxic to aquatic organisms and damages the commercial fishing and tourism industries. Tree-based buffers are an effective method for ...

    Posted at July 6, 2016 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on New farming strategies can help prevent soil runoff while maintaining high crop yields
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