Company News

    image_pdfimage_print
  • Exploiting male killing bacteria to control insects

    A team of scientists has discovered a key mechanism that drives a bacteria that kills male insects, a development that could potentially be exploited to control insect pest species in the future. Numerous insects, including beetles, wasps and butterflies, harbor types of bacteria that are transmitted by females and induce the preferential death of males. This sex-specific lethality benefits the bacteria because males are "dead ends," meaning they don't transmit the bacteria, and ...

    Posted at May 19, 2016 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Exploiting male killing bacteria to control insects
  • Nanoparticles present sustainable way to grow food crops

    Scientists are working diligently to prepare for the expected increase in global population -- and therefore an increased need for food production-- in the coming decades. A team of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis has found a sustainable way to boost the growth of a protein-rich bean by improving the way it absorbs much-needed nutrients. Ramesh Raliya, a research scientist, and Pratim Biswas, the Lucy & Stanley Lopata Professor and chair ...

    Posted at May 11, 2016 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Nanoparticles present sustainable way to grow food crops
  • Farming amoebae carry around detoxifying food

    Humans aren't the only farmers out there. Five years ago, the Queller-Strassmann lab at Rice University, now at Washington University in St. Louis, demonstrated that the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum -- affectionately nicknamed "Dicty" -- can maintain a crop of food bacteria from generation to generation, giving these farmers an advantage when food is scarce. Now, new research from the same team shows that these microscopic farmers also rely on their symbiotic bacteria ...

    Posted at May 5, 2016 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Farming amoebae carry around detoxifying food
  • Natural insect control without pesticides

    Scale insects known as cochineals are major pests of prickly pear in Mexico, and pesticides are often used to control them. However, one prickly pear farmer has been controlling them without the use of insecticides since the year 2000. The farmer tipped off a team of scientists from the Universidad Autónoma Chapingo, and he told them that other insects were feeding on the scale insects. The researchers decided to investigate, and they found ...

    Posted at April 27, 2016 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Natural insect control without pesticides
  • Landscapers benefit from organic land care extension program

    A new study shows the impact of an organic lawn care training program designed for landscapers, including insights into landscapers' attitudes, lessons learned, and challenges. The results also suggest ways in which extension professionals can bring value to organic land management programs. The article, which appeared in the February 2016 issue of HortTechnology, assessed the impact of Rutgers University's Organic Land Care Certificate Program and includes recommendations for similar programs. The one-week certificate ...

    Posted at April 20, 2016 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Landscapers benefit from organic land care extension program
  • Feeding the world: Uncovering a key regulator of flower head development in rice

    Rice is a staple food for more than 3.5 billion people worldwide. Meeting the demand for high-yielding rice is an urgent task for breeders. Superior, high-yielding hybrid plants are often produced by crossing two diverse parental lines. This task is quite complicated in rice, a self-pollinating plant. One approach to solving this problem originated in the 1970s, when Chinese scientists figured out how to produce male sterile (MS) rice lines. The use of ...

    Posted at April 13, 2016 | By : | Categories : Company News | Comments Off on Feeding the world: Uncovering a key regulator of flower head development in rice
  • image_pdfimage_print